Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients are at high risk of developing second primary tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract and this is a chief cause of death. Genomic instability reflecting the propensity and the susceptibility of the genome to acquire multiple alterations is considered a driving force behind multiple carcinogenesis and the alterations of the length of single repetitive genomic sequences or microsatellite instability (MI), implicating impaired DNA repair mechanisms, and could be a sensitive marker for assessing genomic instability in multiple HNC. To investigate whether a genetic defect(s) involving the mismatch repair system constitutes a risk factor in patients with multiple head and neck cancer, we examined replication errors (RER) at 10 microsatellite loci in 21 primary and 5 second primary cancers in 21 patients with multiple malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract, in comparison with match-paired primary HNC from patients without multiple malignancies. A RER+phenotype (alterations at ≥2 loci) was observed at 10 microsatellite alterations on chromosomes 2, 3, 11, 17 in at least one tumor from 15 out of 21 (71.5%) patients with multiple primary cancers but only in 11 tumors from 40 (27.5%) HNC patients with single cancer (P=0.001). A RER+phenotype was also associated with a positive familial cancer history (P=0.046). Our results suggest that a genetic instability may play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple primary cancers and that testing for MI in a primary HNC may be useful in detecting patients with high risk for developing multiple malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract.

Microsatellite instability as biomarker for risk of multiple primary malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract

A Franchi;L Bruschini;
2001

Abstract

Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients are at high risk of developing second primary tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract and this is a chief cause of death. Genomic instability reflecting the propensity and the susceptibility of the genome to acquire multiple alterations is considered a driving force behind multiple carcinogenesis and the alterations of the length of single repetitive genomic sequences or microsatellite instability (MI), implicating impaired DNA repair mechanisms, and could be a sensitive marker for assessing genomic instability in multiple HNC. To investigate whether a genetic defect(s) involving the mismatch repair system constitutes a risk factor in patients with multiple head and neck cancer, we examined replication errors (RER) at 10 microsatellite loci in 21 primary and 5 second primary cancers in 21 patients with multiple malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract, in comparison with match-paired primary HNC from patients without multiple malignancies. A RER+phenotype (alterations at ≥2 loci) was observed at 10 microsatellite alterations on chromosomes 2, 3, 11, 17 in at least one tumor from 15 out of 21 (71.5%) patients with multiple primary cancers but only in 11 tumors from 40 (27.5%) HNC patients with single cancer (P=0.001). A RER+phenotype was also associated with a positive familial cancer history (P=0.046). Our results suggest that a genetic instability may play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple primary cancers and that testing for MI in a primary HNC may be useful in detecting patients with high risk for developing multiple malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract.
Sardi, I; Franchi, A; Bocciolini, C; Mechi, C; Frittelli, A; Bruschini, L; Gallo, O
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/909967
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