The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is considered a key driver of modern climate change. Its multi-decadal variability, however, is poorly understood, owing to the lack of continuous and highly resolved paleoclimate records. Here we present a multi-annually resolved precipitation record with 2-sigma age uncertainties of ±2 years from the northern Mediterranean region, an area facing major hydroclimate changes, to retrieve NAO variability over the past 6,500 years. The data shows a strong linkage of precipitation change and cultural evolution in the Mediterranean and insolation-induced millennial non-stationary behaviors of the NAO. Observations of irregularly-spaced hydroclimatic dynamics with multidecadal-to-multicentennial wet/dry events and rapid shifts within a few decades, especially over the last 3 thousand years, are most likely attributed to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability in the tropical Pacific. Our results reveal that the external and internal forcings both affect the NAO on different timescales.

Irregular North Atlantic Oscillation behaviors over the past 6,500 years

Elisabetta Starnini
Penultimo
;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is considered a key driver of modern climate change. Its multi-decadal variability, however, is poorly understood, owing to the lack of continuous and highly resolved paleoclimate records. Here we present a multi-annually resolved precipitation record with 2-sigma age uncertainties of ±2 years from the northern Mediterranean region, an area facing major hydroclimate changes, to retrieve NAO variability over the past 6,500 years. The data shows a strong linkage of precipitation change and cultural evolution in the Mediterranean and insolation-induced millennial non-stationary behaviors of the NAO. Observations of irregularly-spaced hydroclimatic dynamics with multidecadal-to-multicentennial wet/dry events and rapid shifts within a few decades, especially over the last 3 thousand years, are most likely attributed to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability in the tropical Pacific. Our results reveal that the external and internal forcings both affect the NAO on different timescales.
In corso di stampa
Hu1, Hsun-Ming; Lee2, Shih-Yu; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Michel, Véronique; Yu, Jin-Yi; Valensi, Patricia; Jiang, Xiuyang; Duan, Fucai; Wang, Yongjin; Mii, Horng-Sheng; Chou, Yu-Min; Spötl, Christoph; Wu, Chung-Che; Ahmad Lone, Mahjoor; Starnini, Elisabetta; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/915906
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