Abstract: Canine mast cell tumours (MCTs) present a wide variety of challenging clinical behaviours in terms of predicting the prognosis and choosing appropriate treatment. This study investigated the frequency, risk, and prognostic factors of MCTs in dogs admitted to a single veterinary teaching hospital (VTH). Breed, age, sex, and sexual status in ninety-eight dogs with MCTs (MCT-group) were compared with a control group of 13,077 dogs (VTH-group) obtained from the VTH clinical database from January 2010 to January 2016. Within the MCT-group, signalment, location, size, mass number, ulceration, histopathological grading, presence of lymph node, or distant metastases were compared with each other and with the outcome. Boxers (OR 7.2), American Pit Bull Terriers (OR 5.4), French Bulldogs (OR 4.4) and Labrador Retrievers (OR 2.6) were overrepresented. The MCT-group was significantly older than the VTH-group (p < 0.0001). In comparison with the VTH group, in the MCT-group neutered dogs (OR 2.1) and spayed females (OR 2.3) were predominant compared to intact dogs and intact females, respectively. Ulceration (OR 5.2) and lymph node metastasis (OR 7.1) occurred more frequently in larger MCTs. Both ulceration and MCTs > 3 cm were highly associated with lymph node metastasis (OR 24.8). Recurrence was associated with MCT-related death (OR 10.50, p = 0.0040), and the latter was associated with shorter survival times (p = 0.0115). Dogs with MCTs > 3 cm (p = 0.0040), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0234), or elevated WHO stage (p = 0.0158) had shorter survival times. A significantly higher frequency of MCTs was found in specific breeds, and in older and neutered dogs. MCTs > 3 cm and lymph node or distant metastases were associated with shorter survival times.

Epidemiology of Breed-Related Mast Cell Tumour Occurrence and Prognostic Significance of Clinical Features in a Defined Population of Dogs in West-Central Italy

George Lubas;Eleonora Gori;Francesca Millanta;Veronica Marchetti
2019-01-01

Abstract

Abstract: Canine mast cell tumours (MCTs) present a wide variety of challenging clinical behaviours in terms of predicting the prognosis and choosing appropriate treatment. This study investigated the frequency, risk, and prognostic factors of MCTs in dogs admitted to a single veterinary teaching hospital (VTH). Breed, age, sex, and sexual status in ninety-eight dogs with MCTs (MCT-group) were compared with a control group of 13,077 dogs (VTH-group) obtained from the VTH clinical database from January 2010 to January 2016. Within the MCT-group, signalment, location, size, mass number, ulceration, histopathological grading, presence of lymph node, or distant metastases were compared with each other and with the outcome. Boxers (OR 7.2), American Pit Bull Terriers (OR 5.4), French Bulldogs (OR 4.4) and Labrador Retrievers (OR 2.6) were overrepresented. The MCT-group was significantly older than the VTH-group (p < 0.0001). In comparison with the VTH group, in the MCT-group neutered dogs (OR 2.1) and spayed females (OR 2.3) were predominant compared to intact dogs and intact females, respectively. Ulceration (OR 5.2) and lymph node metastasis (OR 7.1) occurred more frequently in larger MCTs. Both ulceration and MCTs > 3 cm were highly associated with lymph node metastasis (OR 24.8). Recurrence was associated with MCT-related death (OR 10.50, p = 0.0040), and the latter was associated with shorter survival times (p = 0.0115). Dogs with MCTs > 3 cm (p = 0.0040), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0234), or elevated WHO stage (p = 0.0158) had shorter survival times. A significantly higher frequency of MCTs was found in specific breeds, and in older and neutered dogs. MCTs > 3 cm and lymph node or distant metastases were associated with shorter survival times.
Pierini, Alessio; Lubas, George; Gori, Eleonora; Binanti, Diana; Millanta, Francesca; Marchetti, Veronica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/995701
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