Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has a 3-year mortality rate up to 37%, 2–6 times higher than the general population. We present evidence supporting pharmacological therapies to improve patient life expectancy, focusing on inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) combined with long-acting bronchodilators (LABDs). A reduction in 3-year all-cause mortality (ACM) has been shown in patients with severe COPD treated with fluticasone propionate (an ICS) and salmeterol [long-acting beta-agonist (LABA)], compared with placebo. An observational study of elderly patients with severe COPD and multiple comorbidities suggested ICS+LABD reduce ACM compared with LABD monotherapy. Patients with symptomatic COPD at risk of exacerbations saw a mortality benefit with the ICS/long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA)/LABA combinations fluticasone furoate/umeclidinium/vilanterol (FF/UMEC/VI) or budesonide/glycopyrrolate/formoterol (BUD/GLY/FOR) versus UMEC/VI or GLY/FOR (LAMA/LABA combinations) in the IMPACT and ETHOS trials, respectively. Reduced risk of mortality may be due to modulation of airway inflammation, thereby reducing activation of proinflammatory mediators in the peripheral circulation. Importantly, estimated annual risk reduction for ACM with ICS/LAMA/LABA combinations in patients with COPD is of the same order of magnitude as for statins (patients with coronary disease) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (patients with vascular disease). Based on the current data, the pharmacological treatment of COPD appears not only able to improve symptoms and reduce the frequency of exacerbations but is also very promising in improving patient prognosis in the long term.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: moving from symptom relief to mortality reduction

Celi A.;Paggiaro P.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has a 3-year mortality rate up to 37%, 2–6 times higher than the general population. We present evidence supporting pharmacological therapies to improve patient life expectancy, focusing on inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) combined with long-acting bronchodilators (LABDs). A reduction in 3-year all-cause mortality (ACM) has been shown in patients with severe COPD treated with fluticasone propionate (an ICS) and salmeterol [long-acting beta-agonist (LABA)], compared with placebo. An observational study of elderly patients with severe COPD and multiple comorbidities suggested ICS+LABD reduce ACM compared with LABD monotherapy. Patients with symptomatic COPD at risk of exacerbations saw a mortality benefit with the ICS/long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA)/LABA combinations fluticasone furoate/umeclidinium/vilanterol (FF/UMEC/VI) or budesonide/glycopyrrolate/formoterol (BUD/GLY/FOR) versus UMEC/VI or GLY/FOR (LAMA/LABA combinations) in the IMPACT and ETHOS trials, respectively. Reduced risk of mortality may be due to modulation of airway inflammation, thereby reducing activation of proinflammatory mediators in the peripheral circulation. Importantly, estimated annual risk reduction for ACM with ICS/LAMA/LABA combinations in patients with COPD is of the same order of magnitude as for statins (patients with coronary disease) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (patients with vascular disease). Based on the current data, the pharmacological treatment of COPD appears not only able to improve symptoms and reduce the frequency of exacerbations but is also very promising in improving patient prognosis in the long term.
2021
Celi, A.; Latorre, M.; Paggiaro, P.; Pistelli, R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1121200
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