In recent years the use of organic matter soil amendments, such as agricultural by-products, has been implemented with the aim of increasing soil fertility, while minimizing the environmental impact of agriculture. Sheep wool residues (SWR) have shown beneficial effects on plant nutrition and soil properties, while only few works assessed their impact on soil microbial communities. The main aim of this work was to investigate the possible valorization of two SWR types (scoured residues, white wool, WW, and carbonized scoured residues, black wool, BW) as organic soil amendments, in pot-grown olive trees, by evaluating their impact on soil bacterial communities and mycorrhizal symbionts. The two SWR types did not negatively impact on the diversity and composition of soil bacterial communities, as revealed by PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of partial 16S rRNA gene, and on the activity of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), while positively affecting plant growth. Only the highest doses of one SWR type (2% BW) caused a decrease in bacterial diversity and native AMF ability to colonize olive roots. DGGE bands sequencing allowed the identification of the major bacterial taxa. Sequences corresponding to Ohtaekwangia spp., Beta proteobacterium, Blastocatella sp., Ramlibacter monticola and Massilia frigida/rubra, Dongia sp. and Chloroflexi were mainly represented in SWR-amended soils, while those represented by Chryseolinea soli and Acidobacteria were abundant in control soil. Overall, this work showed that SWR may be valorized as organic soil amendments, as soil bacteria and AMF, representing key factors of biological soil fertility, were not negatively affected, while the activity of bacterial genera and species known for their ability to decompose complex compounds was boosted. Further studies will investigate the biodegradation efficiency of the diverse bacterial taxa developing in SWR-amended soils.

Impact of sheep wool residues as soil amendments on olive beneficial symbionts and bacterial diversity

Palla, Michela
Co-primo
;
Turrini, Alessandra
Co-primo
;
Cristani, Caterina;Grassi, Arianna;Giovannetti, Manuela
Penultimo
;
Agnolucci, Monica
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

In recent years the use of organic matter soil amendments, such as agricultural by-products, has been implemented with the aim of increasing soil fertility, while minimizing the environmental impact of agriculture. Sheep wool residues (SWR) have shown beneficial effects on plant nutrition and soil properties, while only few works assessed their impact on soil microbial communities. The main aim of this work was to investigate the possible valorization of two SWR types (scoured residues, white wool, WW, and carbonized scoured residues, black wool, BW) as organic soil amendments, in pot-grown olive trees, by evaluating their impact on soil bacterial communities and mycorrhizal symbionts. The two SWR types did not negatively impact on the diversity and composition of soil bacterial communities, as revealed by PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of partial 16S rRNA gene, and on the activity of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), while positively affecting plant growth. Only the highest doses of one SWR type (2% BW) caused a decrease in bacterial diversity and native AMF ability to colonize olive roots. DGGE bands sequencing allowed the identification of the major bacterial taxa. Sequences corresponding to Ohtaekwangia spp., Beta proteobacterium, Blastocatella sp., Ramlibacter monticola and Massilia frigida/rubra, Dongia sp. and Chloroflexi were mainly represented in SWR-amended soils, while those represented by Chryseolinea soli and Acidobacteria were abundant in control soil. Overall, this work showed that SWR may be valorized as organic soil amendments, as soil bacteria and AMF, representing key factors of biological soil fertility, were not negatively affected, while the activity of bacterial genera and species known for their ability to decompose complex compounds was boosted. Further studies will investigate the biodegradation efficiency of the diverse bacterial taxa developing in SWR-amended soils.
Palla, Michela; Turrini, Alessandra; Cristani, Caterina; Bonora, Laura; Pellegrini, David; Primicerio, Jacopo; Grassi, Arianna; Hilaj, Filip; Giovannetti, Manuela; Agnolucci, Monica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/1142522
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