Simple Summary Studies on wild animal parasites are considered crucial for the adoption of effective strategies aimed at reducing the impact of these pathogens on evolving ecosystems. This study aimed to assess and compare gastrointestinal nematodes and protozoa and other parasites detectable with coprological analysis in free-ranging wolf and red fox populations living in natural and anthropized areas of Tuscany (Central Italy). This comparison allowed us to detect significant differences in the occurrence and frequency of some parasite taxa considering the same canid species in different environments (natural and anthropized) and the two canid species in the same environment. Data obtained in this study may indicate different parasite risks and different roles played by the wolf and the fox in the diffusion of specific parasite taxa in the environments considered herein. Gastrointestinal nematodes and protozoa and other parasite occurrences were evaluated in free-ranging wolf (Canis lupus italicus) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations from natural and anthropized areas of Central Italy. Analyzed fecal samples were collected from 60 foxes and 40 wolves in the anthropized areas, and 41 foxes and 39 wolves in the natural areas. In foxes, hookworm infections (p < 0.0001) were more frequently recorded in the anthropized environment, while coccidia (p < 0.05) and Cryptosporidium spp. (p < 0.0001) were more frequent in the natural area. In wolves, a higher frequency of hookworms (p < 0.0001) was observed in natural areas, while coccidia were more common in the anthropized area (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the natural environment, trichuroid nematodes (p < 0.0001) were significantly more frequent in wolves than in foxes, while Cryptosporidium (p < 0.001) and Giardia duodenalis (p < 0.001) were more common in foxes. In the anthropic area, the occurrence of hookworms was found to be significantly higher in foxes (p < 0.0001), while trichuroid nematodes were more common in wolves (p < 0.0001). The obtained data are indicative of a different diffusion of specific parasite taxa in wolves and foxes living in the natural and/or anthropized environments examined herein.

Gray Wolf (Canis lupus italicus) and Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes) Parasite Survey in Anthropized and Natural Areas of Central Italy

Perrucci, Stefania
;
Coppola, Francesca;Felicioli, Antonio
2023-01-01

Abstract

Simple Summary Studies on wild animal parasites are considered crucial for the adoption of effective strategies aimed at reducing the impact of these pathogens on evolving ecosystems. This study aimed to assess and compare gastrointestinal nematodes and protozoa and other parasites detectable with coprological analysis in free-ranging wolf and red fox populations living in natural and anthropized areas of Tuscany (Central Italy). This comparison allowed us to detect significant differences in the occurrence and frequency of some parasite taxa considering the same canid species in different environments (natural and anthropized) and the two canid species in the same environment. Data obtained in this study may indicate different parasite risks and different roles played by the wolf and the fox in the diffusion of specific parasite taxa in the environments considered herein. Gastrointestinal nematodes and protozoa and other parasite occurrences were evaluated in free-ranging wolf (Canis lupus italicus) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations from natural and anthropized areas of Central Italy. Analyzed fecal samples were collected from 60 foxes and 40 wolves in the anthropized areas, and 41 foxes and 39 wolves in the natural areas. In foxes, hookworm infections (p < 0.0001) were more frequently recorded in the anthropized environment, while coccidia (p < 0.05) and Cryptosporidium spp. (p < 0.0001) were more frequent in the natural area. In wolves, a higher frequency of hookworms (p < 0.0001) was observed in natural areas, while coccidia were more common in the anthropized area (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the natural environment, trichuroid nematodes (p < 0.0001) were significantly more frequent in wolves than in foxes, while Cryptosporidium (p < 0.001) and Giardia duodenalis (p < 0.001) were more common in foxes. In the anthropic area, the occurrence of hookworms was found to be significantly higher in foxes (p < 0.0001), while trichuroid nematodes were more common in wolves (p < 0.0001). The obtained data are indicative of a different diffusion of specific parasite taxa in wolves and foxes living in the natural and/or anthropized environments examined herein.
2023
Perrucci, Stefania; Maestrini, Michela; Coppola, Francesca; Di Marco, Matteo; Rosso, Alessia Di; Pacini, Maria Irene; Zintu, Paola; Felicioli, Antonio...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1176369
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