Scope: Modifications in intestinal microbiota and its metabolites, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are main factors altering intestinal epithelial barrier integrity and eliciting the onset of a meta-inflammation observed in obesity. The present study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of Enterococcus faecium (SF68) administration in counteracting the impairment of gut barrier and enteric inflammation in a model of diet-induced obesity, characterizing the molecular mechanisms underlying such beneficial effects. Methods and Results: Male C57BL/6J mice, fed with standard diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD), are treated with SF68 (108 CFU day−1). After 8 weeks, plasma interleukin (IL)-1β and lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) are measured, analysis of fecal microbiota composition and butyrate content as well as intestinal malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, mucins, tight junction protein, and butyrate transporter expression are investigated. After 8 weeks, SF68 administration counteracts the body weight gain in HFD mice, reducing plasma IL-1β and LBP. In parallel, SF68 treatment acts against the intestinal inflammation in HFD-fed animals and improves the intestinal barrier integrity and functionality in obese mice via the increase in tight junction protein and intestinal butyrate transporter (sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1) expression. Conclusions: Supplementation with SF68 reduces intestinal inflammation and reinforces the enteric epithelial barrier in obese mice, improving the transport and utilization of butyrate.

Dietary Supplementation with the Probiotic SF68 Reinforces Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in Obese Mice by Improving Butyrate Bioavailability

Benvenuti L.;D'Antongiovanni V.;Pellegrini C.;Fornai M.;Bernardini N.;Ippolito C.;Segnani C.;Di Salvo C.;Martelli A.;Flori L.;Calderone V.;Ghelardi E.;Calvigioni M.;Panattoni A.;Antonioli L.
2023-01-01

Abstract

Scope: Modifications in intestinal microbiota and its metabolites, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are main factors altering intestinal epithelial barrier integrity and eliciting the onset of a meta-inflammation observed in obesity. The present study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of Enterococcus faecium (SF68) administration in counteracting the impairment of gut barrier and enteric inflammation in a model of diet-induced obesity, characterizing the molecular mechanisms underlying such beneficial effects. Methods and Results: Male C57BL/6J mice, fed with standard diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD), are treated with SF68 (108 CFU day−1). After 8 weeks, plasma interleukin (IL)-1β and lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) are measured, analysis of fecal microbiota composition and butyrate content as well as intestinal malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, mucins, tight junction protein, and butyrate transporter expression are investigated. After 8 weeks, SF68 administration counteracts the body weight gain in HFD mice, reducing plasma IL-1β and LBP. In parallel, SF68 treatment acts against the intestinal inflammation in HFD-fed animals and improves the intestinal barrier integrity and functionality in obese mice via the increase in tight junction protein and intestinal butyrate transporter (sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1) expression. Conclusions: Supplementation with SF68 reduces intestinal inflammation and reinforces the enteric epithelial barrier in obese mice, improving the transport and utilization of butyrate.
2023
Benvenuti, L.; D'Antongiovanni, V.; Pellegrini, C.; Fornai, M.; Bernardini, N.; Ippolito, C.; Segnani, C.; Di Salvo, C.; Colucci, R.; Martelli, A.; Fl...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1177328
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