Aquaculture significantly contributes to the growing demand for food worldwide. However, diseases associated with intensive aquaculture conditions, especially the skin related syndromes, may have significant implications on fish health and industry. In farmed rainbow trout, red mark syndrome (RMS), which consists of multiple skin lesions, currently lacks recognized aetiological agents, and increased efforts are needed to elucidate the onset of these conditions. Most of the past studies were focused on analyzing skin lesions, but no study focused on water, a medium constantly interacting with fish. Indeed, water tanks are environmental niches colonized by microbial communities, which may be implicated in the onset of the disease. Here, we present the results of water and sediment microbiome analyses performed in an RMS-affected aquaculture facility, bringing new knowledge about the environmental microbiomes harbored under these conditions. On the whole, no significant differences in the bacterial community structure were reported in RMS-affected tanks compared to the RMS-free ones. However, we highlighted significant differences in microbiome composition when analyzing different samples source (i.e., water and sediments). Looking at the finer scale, we measured significant changes in the relative abundances of specific taxa in RMS-affected tanks, especially when analyzing water samples. Our results provide worthwhile insight into a mostly uncharacterized ecological scenario, aiding future studies on the aquaculture built environment for disease prevention and monitoring.

Red mark syndrome: Is the aquaculture water microbiome a keystone for understanding the disease aetiology?

Galimberti A.;Petroni G.;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Aquaculture significantly contributes to the growing demand for food worldwide. However, diseases associated with intensive aquaculture conditions, especially the skin related syndromes, may have significant implications on fish health and industry. In farmed rainbow trout, red mark syndrome (RMS), which consists of multiple skin lesions, currently lacks recognized aetiological agents, and increased efforts are needed to elucidate the onset of these conditions. Most of the past studies were focused on analyzing skin lesions, but no study focused on water, a medium constantly interacting with fish. Indeed, water tanks are environmental niches colonized by microbial communities, which may be implicated in the onset of the disease. Here, we present the results of water and sediment microbiome analyses performed in an RMS-affected aquaculture facility, bringing new knowledge about the environmental microbiomes harbored under these conditions. On the whole, no significant differences in the bacterial community structure were reported in RMS-affected tanks compared to the RMS-free ones. However, we highlighted significant differences in microbiome composition when analyzing different samples source (i.e., water and sediments). Looking at the finer scale, we measured significant changes in the relative abundances of specific taxa in RMS-affected tanks, especially when analyzing water samples. Our results provide worthwhile insight into a mostly uncharacterized ecological scenario, aiding future studies on the aquaculture built environment for disease prevention and monitoring.
2023
Bruno, A.; Cafiso, A.; Sandionigi, A.; Galimberti, A.; Magnani, D.; Manfrin, A.; Petroni, G.; Casiraghi, M.; Bazzocchi, C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1189257
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