Mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) arise from oligodendrocyte precursor cells that, in case of demyelination, are recruited at the lesion site to remyelinate the axons and therefore restore the transmission of nerve impulses. It has been widely documented that exogenously administered steroid molecules are potent inducers of myelination. However, little is known about how neurosteroids produced de novo by OLs can impact this process. Here, we employed a human OL precursor cell line to investigate the role of de novo neurosteroidogenesis in the regulation of OLs differentiation, paying particular attention to the 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) which controls the rate-limiting step of the neurosteroidogenic process. Our results showed that, over the time of OL maturation, the availability of cholesterol, which is the neurosteroidogenesis initial substrate, and key members of the neurosteroidogenic machinery, including TSPO, were upregulated. In addition, OLs differentiation was impaired following neurosteroidogenesis inhibition and TSPO silencing. On the contrary, TSPO pharmacological stimulation promoted neurosteroidogenic function and positively impacted differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that de novo neurosteroidogenesis is actively involved in the autocrine and paracrine regulation of human OL differentiation. Moreover, since TSPO was able to promote OL differentiation through a positive modulation of the neurosteroid biosynthetic process, it could be exploited as a promising target to tackle demyelinating diseases.

Human oligodendrocyte-like cell differentiation is promoted by TSPO-mediated endogenous steroidogenesis

Chiara Tremolanti;Elisa Angeloni;Eleonora Da Pozzo
;
Lorenzo Germelli;Chiara Giacomelli;Eduardo Scalzi;Sabrina Taliani;Federico Da Settimo;Claudia Martini;Barbara Costa
2024-01-01

Abstract

Mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) arise from oligodendrocyte precursor cells that, in case of demyelination, are recruited at the lesion site to remyelinate the axons and therefore restore the transmission of nerve impulses. It has been widely documented that exogenously administered steroid molecules are potent inducers of myelination. However, little is known about how neurosteroids produced de novo by OLs can impact this process. Here, we employed a human OL precursor cell line to investigate the role of de novo neurosteroidogenesis in the regulation of OLs differentiation, paying particular attention to the 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) which controls the rate-limiting step of the neurosteroidogenic process. Our results showed that, over the time of OL maturation, the availability of cholesterol, which is the neurosteroidogenesis initial substrate, and key members of the neurosteroidogenic machinery, including TSPO, were upregulated. In addition, OLs differentiation was impaired following neurosteroidogenesis inhibition and TSPO silencing. On the contrary, TSPO pharmacological stimulation promoted neurosteroidogenic function and positively impacted differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that de novo neurosteroidogenesis is actively involved in the autocrine and paracrine regulation of human OL differentiation. Moreover, since TSPO was able to promote OL differentiation through a positive modulation of the neurosteroid biosynthetic process, it could be exploited as a promising target to tackle demyelinating diseases.
2024
Tremolanti, Chiara; Angeloni, Elisa; DA POZZO, Eleonora; Germelli, Lorenzo; Giacomelli, Chiara; Scalzi, Eduardo; Taliani, Sabrina; DA SETTIMO PASSETTI, Federico; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoé-Guy; Martini, Claudia; Costa, Barbara
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1240547
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