The relaxation scenario in aqueous systems, such as mixtures of water with hydrophilic solutes, nano-confined water and hydrated biomolecules, has been shown to exhibit general features, in spite of the huge differences in structure, chemical composition and complexity. Dynamics, in all these systems, invariably shows at least two relaxations: (i) a slower process, related to cooperative and structural motions of water and solute molecules (in the case of mixtures) or related to interfacial processes in the case of confined water and (ii) a faster process, with non-cooperative character originating from water. The latter has properties including timescale and temperature dependence similar or related in all the aqueous systems. This water-specific relaxation can be identified as the primitive relaxation, or the Johari-Goldstein beta-relaxation. The primitive process is the precursor of the many-body relaxation process which increases in length-scale with time until the terminal a-relaxation is reached. Using new experimental data (at atmospheric and high pressure) along with a revision of most of the recent literature on the dynamics of confined water and aqueous mixtures, we show that the two abovementioned relaxation processes are inter-related as evidenced by correlations in their properties. For instance, both relaxation time and dielectric strength of the water-specific relaxation exhibit a crossover from a stronger to a weaker dependence with decreasing T, at the temperature where the slow process attains a very long timescale (>1 ks) and becomes structurally arrested, exactly analogous to that found for beta-relaxation in van der Waals liquids. Moreover, the primitive relaxation of water is shown to play a pivotal role in determining the dynamics of hydrated biomolecules in general, including the "dynamic transition" observed by neutron scattering and Mossbauer spectroscopy. We show that the primitive relaxation of the solvent is responsible for the dynamic transition, even in the case that the solvent is not pure water or an aqueous mixture. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

The role of primitive relaxation in the dynamics of aqueous mixtures, nano-confined water and hydrated proteins RID A-8503-2012

ROLLA, PIERANGELO;
2011-01-01

Abstract

The relaxation scenario in aqueous systems, such as mixtures of water with hydrophilic solutes, nano-confined water and hydrated biomolecules, has been shown to exhibit general features, in spite of the huge differences in structure, chemical composition and complexity. Dynamics, in all these systems, invariably shows at least two relaxations: (i) a slower process, related to cooperative and structural motions of water and solute molecules (in the case of mixtures) or related to interfacial processes in the case of confined water and (ii) a faster process, with non-cooperative character originating from water. The latter has properties including timescale and temperature dependence similar or related in all the aqueous systems. This water-specific relaxation can be identified as the primitive relaxation, or the Johari-Goldstein beta-relaxation. The primitive process is the precursor of the many-body relaxation process which increases in length-scale with time until the terminal a-relaxation is reached. Using new experimental data (at atmospheric and high pressure) along with a revision of most of the recent literature on the dynamics of confined water and aqueous mixtures, we show that the two abovementioned relaxation processes are inter-related as evidenced by correlations in their properties. For instance, both relaxation time and dielectric strength of the water-specific relaxation exhibit a crossover from a stronger to a weaker dependence with decreasing T, at the temperature where the slow process attains a very long timescale (>1 ks) and becomes structurally arrested, exactly analogous to that found for beta-relaxation in van der Waals liquids. Moreover, the primitive relaxation of water is shown to play a pivotal role in determining the dynamics of hydrated biomolecules in general, including the "dynamic transition" observed by neutron scattering and Mossbauer spectroscopy. We show that the primitive relaxation of the solvent is responsible for the dynamic transition, even in the case that the solvent is not pure water or an aqueous mixture. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
2011
Capaccioli, S; Ngai, Kl; Ancherbak, S; Rolla, Pierangelo; Shinyashiki, N.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/151020
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