Dogs can be infected by several nematodes of the Trichuridae family. Trichuridae eggs have a similar morphology and misdiagnosis among different species is possible. Eucoleus boehmi (syn. Capillaria boehmi) lives in the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of foxes, wolves and dogs. This parasite was identified for the first time as a new species in silver foxes from Moravia and Austria (Supperer R, 1953, Z Parasitenk, 16: 51-55) and then reported in wild animals in several European regions (Zarnowsky E and Patyk W, 1960, Acta Parasitol Pol, 8: 205-213; Sréter T et al, 2003,Vet Parasitol, 115: 329–334; Davidson RK et al, 2006, Vet Parasitol, 136: 307-316); in dogs few cases are reported in Europe (Zarnowsky E and Patyk W, 1960, Acta Parasitol Pol, 8: 205-213; Gajewska A et al, 2004, Zycie Weterynaryjne,79: 208-212; De Liberato C, 2009, Parassitologia, 51: 43-45) and in north America (Campbell BG and Little MD, 1991, JAVMA, 198: 1520-1523; Schoning P et al, 1993, Vet Res Commun, 17: 277-281; Baan M et al, 2011, JAAHA, 47: 60-63). E.boehmi may cause nasal discharge, sneezing and anosmia (PiperisovaI et al, 2010, Vet Clin Path, 39: 121-122). The life cycle is yet not completely clear (Conboy GA, 2009, Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract, 39: 1109-1126); eggs are released into the environment via hosts’ faeces, reaching the infective stage after 7-8 days (Pérez Tort G, 2010,Vet Focus, 20: 44-48). The aim of our work is to report the presence of E.boehmi in dogs in Italy and to describe the eggs using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

First report of Eucoleus boehmi (syn. Capillaria boehmi) in dogs In north-western italy, with scanning electron microscopy of the eggs

TORRACCA, BEATRICE;MACCHIONI, FABIO
2012

Abstract

Dogs can be infected by several nematodes of the Trichuridae family. Trichuridae eggs have a similar morphology and misdiagnosis among different species is possible. Eucoleus boehmi (syn. Capillaria boehmi) lives in the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of foxes, wolves and dogs. This parasite was identified for the first time as a new species in silver foxes from Moravia and Austria (Supperer R, 1953, Z Parasitenk, 16: 51-55) and then reported in wild animals in several European regions (Zarnowsky E and Patyk W, 1960, Acta Parasitol Pol, 8: 205-213; Sréter T et al, 2003,Vet Parasitol, 115: 329–334; Davidson RK et al, 2006, Vet Parasitol, 136: 307-316); in dogs few cases are reported in Europe (Zarnowsky E and Patyk W, 1960, Acta Parasitol Pol, 8: 205-213; Gajewska A et al, 2004, Zycie Weterynaryjne,79: 208-212; De Liberato C, 2009, Parassitologia, 51: 43-45) and in north America (Campbell BG and Little MD, 1991, JAVMA, 198: 1520-1523; Schoning P et al, 1993, Vet Res Commun, 17: 277-281; Baan M et al, 2011, JAAHA, 47: 60-63). E.boehmi may cause nasal discharge, sneezing and anosmia (PiperisovaI et al, 2010, Vet Clin Path, 39: 121-122). The life cycle is yet not completely clear (Conboy GA, 2009, Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract, 39: 1109-1126); eggs are released into the environment via hosts’ faeces, reaching the infective stage after 7-8 days (Pérez Tort G, 2010,Vet Focus, 20: 44-48). The aim of our work is to report the presence of E.boehmi in dogs in Italy and to describe the eggs using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).
Magi, Marta; Guardone, L.; Prati, Mc; Torracca, Beatrice; Macchioni, Fabio
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/205019
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