Abstract: Few data have been published so far on the long-term metabolic and endocrine consequences of intrasplenic islet autografts in dogs and the available information mainly deals with glucose response and, more rarely, insulin secretion during intravenous glucose tolerance tests. The effect of islet transplantation on glucagon levels has never been reported. In this study we measured glucose, insulin, total glucagon, and pancreatic glucagon in dogs before and after (up to 1 year) intrasplenic islet autografts. Pancreata were retrieved from 21 adult dogs and the islets were isolated by collagenase digestion. The endocrine tissue was transplanted into the spleen by direct pulp injection. Autografts resulted in normoglycaemia in 19 out of 21 dogs (90 %). Among the successfully transplanted dogs, the percentage of functioning grafts was 71 % at 1 year. The metabolic and hormonal results of the follow-up showed that fasting glucose and insulin concentrations did not differ significantly before and after transplantation. However, glucose tolerance and insulin secretion on intravenous glucose tolerance testing were significantly reduced in transplanted animals. Fasting total and pancreatic glucagon, and their integrated releases during the test did not change significantly after islet transplantation. These results demonstrate that : 1) long-term function of intrasplenic canine islet autografts can be achieved in high percentages ; 2) autotransplanted animals have normal or near normal fasting glucose and insulin levels, but reduced glucose disappearance and insulin secretion on intravenous glucose tolerance tests ; 3) normal glucagon secretion is a feature of successfull islet grafts.

Assessment of long-term (1 year) graft survival and metabolic and hormonal changes after intrasplenic canine pancreatic microfragment transplantation

MARCHETTI, PIERO;
1993

Abstract

Abstract: Few data have been published so far on the long-term metabolic and endocrine consequences of intrasplenic islet autografts in dogs and the available information mainly deals with glucose response and, more rarely, insulin secretion during intravenous glucose tolerance tests. The effect of islet transplantation on glucagon levels has never been reported. In this study we measured glucose, insulin, total glucagon, and pancreatic glucagon in dogs before and after (up to 1 year) intrasplenic islet autografts. Pancreata were retrieved from 21 adult dogs and the islets were isolated by collagenase digestion. The endocrine tissue was transplanted into the spleen by direct pulp injection. Autografts resulted in normoglycaemia in 19 out of 21 dogs (90 %). Among the successfully transplanted dogs, the percentage of functioning grafts was 71 % at 1 year. The metabolic and hormonal results of the follow-up showed that fasting glucose and insulin concentrations did not differ significantly before and after transplantation. However, glucose tolerance and insulin secretion on intravenous glucose tolerance testing were significantly reduced in transplanted animals. Fasting total and pancreatic glucagon, and their integrated releases during the test did not change significantly after islet transplantation. These results demonstrate that : 1) long-term function of intrasplenic canine islet autografts can be achieved in high percentages ; 2) autotransplanted animals have normal or near normal fasting glucose and insulin levels, but reduced glucose disappearance and insulin secretion on intravenous glucose tolerance tests ; 3) normal glucagon secretion is a feature of successfull islet grafts.
Marchetti, Piero; Olack, B; Swanson, C; Newton, M; Scharp, Dw
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/21254
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact