Because of the importance of pheasants as a game bird species in many European Countries, information on the success of the restocking programs is interesting for evaluation. For this reason the survival, behaviour and habitat selection of 10 wild translocated and 20 released ring-necked pheasants (10 offspring of wild captured and 10 from the farmed strain, both farm-reared) was studied using radio-telemetry during March-August (fixes were grouped in 3 categorized periods: March 2 - April 18; April 19 - May 28; May 29 - August 16). All the captive reared pheasants were reared according to the new disciplinary rules set forth by the Toscana region for the production of pheasants destined to be released in the wild as part of a game repopulation program. The study was carried out in a hilly area of the Tuscany characterised by 18.1% woodland (core: 1654895E, 4850468N). Results showed that live weights were higher in the farm-reared pheasants (either directly captured or offspring of the captured, P<0.05). The tarsus length statistically differed between the farmed offspring of the captured pheasants and the farm strain (P<0.05). The survival rates and breeding success of the surviving subjects were very high and did not differ between groups (survival rates: 50.0%, 70.0% and 80.0%, and breeding success: 60.0%, 28.6% and 50.0%, for the captive-reared offspring of captured wild pheasants, the captive-reared farm pheasants and the captured wild pheasants, respectively). The dispersion increased with time in the wild translocated pheasants (576 m, 889 m and 1209 m) while the offspring of the captured wild pheasants and the farm strain remained in the vicinity of the releasing site. The wild pheasants showed an increasing distance from the country houses, contrary to the offspring of captured wild pheasants and the farm strain. Artificial feeding stations were better used by the farm-reared pheasants, which remained in the vicinity of the artificial feeding points. The results of our study showed that pheasants, reared according to the disciplinary rules stated for the production of pheasants for wildlife reproduction programs, although more expensive, can guarantee the genetic identity with the resident populations and are able to provide good survival rates and breeding success of the released pheasants, of course when restocking is carried out in areas suitable for pheasant wildlife.

Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) hens of different origin. Dispersion and habitat use after release

BAGLIACCA, MARCO;FRONTE, BALDASSARE
2008

Abstract

Because of the importance of pheasants as a game bird species in many European Countries, information on the success of the restocking programs is interesting for evaluation. For this reason the survival, behaviour and habitat selection of 10 wild translocated and 20 released ring-necked pheasants (10 offspring of wild captured and 10 from the farmed strain, both farm-reared) was studied using radio-telemetry during March-August (fixes were grouped in 3 categorized periods: March 2 - April 18; April 19 - May 28; May 29 - August 16). All the captive reared pheasants were reared according to the new disciplinary rules set forth by the Toscana region for the production of pheasants destined to be released in the wild as part of a game repopulation program. The study was carried out in a hilly area of the Tuscany characterised by 18.1% woodland (core: 1654895E, 4850468N). Results showed that live weights were higher in the farm-reared pheasants (either directly captured or offspring of the captured, P<0.05). The tarsus length statistically differed between the farmed offspring of the captured pheasants and the farm strain (P<0.05). The survival rates and breeding success of the surviving subjects were very high and did not differ between groups (survival rates: 50.0%, 70.0% and 80.0%, and breeding success: 60.0%, 28.6% and 50.0%, for the captive-reared offspring of captured wild pheasants, the captive-reared farm pheasants and the captured wild pheasants, respectively). The dispersion increased with time in the wild translocated pheasants (576 m, 889 m and 1209 m) while the offspring of the captured wild pheasants and the farm strain remained in the vicinity of the releasing site. The wild pheasants showed an increasing distance from the country houses, contrary to the offspring of captured wild pheasants and the farm strain. Artificial feeding stations were better used by the farm-reared pheasants, which remained in the vicinity of the artificial feeding points. The results of our study showed that pheasants, reared according to the disciplinary rules stated for the production of pheasants for wildlife reproduction programs, although more expensive, can guarantee the genetic identity with the resident populations and are able to provide good survival rates and breeding success of the released pheasants, of course when restocking is carried out in areas suitable for pheasant wildlife.
Bagliacca, Marco; Falcini, F.; Porrini, S.; Zalli, F.; Fronte, Baldassare
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/237899
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