OBJECTIVES: In multiple sclerosis (MS) oxidative injury likely plays a major role in disease progression and in damaging tissue in the central nervous system (CNS), although with different mechanisms in the initial and the progressive disease stages. We compared the biomarker levels of plasmatic oxidative stress in patients with relapsing remitting (RR) and secondary progressive (SP) MS in order to correlate biomarker levels with demographic and clinical variables. DESIGN AND METHODS: We included 60 consecutive MS patients (30 with RR-MS and 30 with SP-MS) and a control group of 81 healthy subjects. All patients underwent clinical assessment, including disability, fatigue and sleepiness evaluations and blood sample collection for advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), plasmatic ferric reducing ability (FRA) and thiol group dosage. RESULTS: Plasmatic AOPPs were significantly higher while FRA and thiol levels were lower in MS patients compared to healthy controls. No difference was found in oxidative stress biomarker values in RR and SP-MS patients. However, in patients with "active" disease, FRA levels and thiol groups (expression of antioxidant power) were significantly lower. No significant correlation was found with demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, including age, disease duration, disability, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS: Plasmatic AOPPs, FRA and thiol groups show oxidative damage and reduced antioxidant capability in MS. Although their power to characterize different courses of the disease is limited, they seem to be related to disease activity.

Plasmatic oxidative stress biomarkers in multiple sclerosis: Relation with clinical and demographic characteristics.

PASQUALI, LIVIA;PECORI, CHIARA;IUDICE, ALFONSO;SICILIANO, GABRIELE;BONUCCELLI, UBALDO
2015-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In multiple sclerosis (MS) oxidative injury likely plays a major role in disease progression and in damaging tissue in the central nervous system (CNS), although with different mechanisms in the initial and the progressive disease stages. We compared the biomarker levels of plasmatic oxidative stress in patients with relapsing remitting (RR) and secondary progressive (SP) MS in order to correlate biomarker levels with demographic and clinical variables. DESIGN AND METHODS: We included 60 consecutive MS patients (30 with RR-MS and 30 with SP-MS) and a control group of 81 healthy subjects. All patients underwent clinical assessment, including disability, fatigue and sleepiness evaluations and blood sample collection for advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), plasmatic ferric reducing ability (FRA) and thiol group dosage. RESULTS: Plasmatic AOPPs were significantly higher while FRA and thiol levels were lower in MS patients compared to healthy controls. No difference was found in oxidative stress biomarker values in RR and SP-MS patients. However, in patients with "active" disease, FRA levels and thiol groups (expression of antioxidant power) were significantly lower. No significant correlation was found with demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, including age, disease duration, disability, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS: Plasmatic AOPPs, FRA and thiol groups show oxidative damage and reduced antioxidant capability in MS. Although their power to characterize different courses of the disease is limited, they seem to be related to disease activity.
2015
Pasquali, Livia; Pecori, Chiara; Lucchesi, C; Logerfo, A; Iudice, Alfonso; Siciliano, Gabriele; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/669672
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 10
  • Scopus 32
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 33
social impact