This volume is focused on what we call conventional power generation systems, that is, those systems that are well known and have been used to generate electric power worldwide in the past six decades. When every one of us switches a light on, recharges his or her mobile phone, or drives to work or to the supermarket, he or she is using the electric energy that is mostly generated by a steam power plant (nuclear or fossil fired), a gas turbine, a combined gas–steam power plant, or an internal combustion engine (ICE). A smaller, but still consistent share, of the generated electricity comes from other plants such as organic Rankine cycles, fuel cells, and other emerging energy systems. Some of us are also heating and cooling their homes and offices using heat recovered from the above-mentioned power plants and other industrial waste heat. Similarly, when we switch on the heating in our cars, we recover heat that would be otherwise rejected to the atmosphere. These examples belong to the category of combined heat and power (CHP) or combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) systems, often called cogeneration or polygeneration systems. The intent of this volume is to look at conventional energy systems from a wide-angle viewpoint, in order to present their development, their performance in terms of efficiency, power output, and emissions, and the known directions to follow for their evolution, with the aim of providing the reader with the instruments to know and possibly develop new ideas to make those systems cleaner and operationally more flexible.

Introduction: Clean Energy Conversion Technologies

DESIDERI, UMBERTO;
2015

Abstract

This volume is focused on what we call conventional power generation systems, that is, those systems that are well known and have been used to generate electric power worldwide in the past six decades. When every one of us switches a light on, recharges his or her mobile phone, or drives to work or to the supermarket, he or she is using the electric energy that is mostly generated by a steam power plant (nuclear or fossil fired), a gas turbine, a combined gas–steam power plant, or an internal combustion engine (ICE). A smaller, but still consistent share, of the generated electricity comes from other plants such as organic Rankine cycles, fuel cells, and other emerging energy systems. Some of us are also heating and cooling their homes and offices using heat recovered from the above-mentioned power plants and other industrial waste heat. Similarly, when we switch on the heating in our cars, we recover heat that would be otherwise rejected to the atmosphere. These examples belong to the category of combined heat and power (CHP) or combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) systems, often called cogeneration or polygeneration systems. The intent of this volume is to look at conventional energy systems from a wide-angle viewpoint, in order to present their development, their performance in terms of efficiency, power output, and emissions, and the known directions to follow for their evolution, with the aim of providing the reader with the instruments to know and possibly develop new ideas to make those systems cleaner and operationally more flexible.
9781118991978
9781118388587
9781118991978
9781118388587
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/751016
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