Water deficit triggers a dynamic and integrated cross-talk between leaves and roots. Tolerant plants have developed several physiological and molecular mechanisms to establish new cell metabolism homeostasis, avoiding and/or escaping from permanent impairments triggered by drought. Two tomato genotypes (a Southern Italy landrace called Ciettaicale and the well-known commercial cultivar Moneymaker) were investigated at vegetative stage to assess leaf and root metabolic strategies under 20 days of water deficit. Physiological and metabolic changes, in terms of ABA, IAA, proline, soluble sugars and phenols contents, occurred in both tomato genotypes under water stress. Overall, our results pointed out the higher plasticity of Ciettaicale to manage plant water status under drought in order to preserve the source-sink relationships. This aim was achieved by maintaining a more efficient leaf photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, as suggested by chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, associated with a major investment towards root growth and activity to improve water uptake. On the contrary, the higher accumulation of carbon compounds, resulting from reduced PSII photochemistry and enhanced starch reserve mobilization, in leaves and roots of Moneymaker under drought could play a key role in the osmotic adjustment, although causing a feedback disruption of the source-sink relations. This hypothesis was also supported by the different drought-induced redox unbalance, as suggested by H2O2 and MDA contents. This could affect both PSII photochemistry and root activity, leading to a major involvement of NPQ and antioxidant system in response to drought in Moneymaker than Ciettaicale.

Drought induced changes of leaf-to-root relationships in two tomato genotypes

Lorenzo Mariotti;Lorenzo Guglielminetti
;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Water deficit triggers a dynamic and integrated cross-talk between leaves and roots. Tolerant plants have developed several physiological and molecular mechanisms to establish new cell metabolism homeostasis, avoiding and/or escaping from permanent impairments triggered by drought. Two tomato genotypes (a Southern Italy landrace called Ciettaicale and the well-known commercial cultivar Moneymaker) were investigated at vegetative stage to assess leaf and root metabolic strategies under 20 days of water deficit. Physiological and metabolic changes, in terms of ABA, IAA, proline, soluble sugars and phenols contents, occurred in both tomato genotypes under water stress. Overall, our results pointed out the higher plasticity of Ciettaicale to manage plant water status under drought in order to preserve the source-sink relationships. This aim was achieved by maintaining a more efficient leaf photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, as suggested by chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, associated with a major investment towards root growth and activity to improve water uptake. On the contrary, the higher accumulation of carbon compounds, resulting from reduced PSII photochemistry and enhanced starch reserve mobilization, in leaves and roots of Moneymaker under drought could play a key role in the osmotic adjustment, although causing a feedback disruption of the source-sink relations. This hypothesis was also supported by the different drought-induced redox unbalance, as suggested by H2O2 and MDA contents. This could affect both PSII photochemistry and root activity, leading to a major involvement of NPQ and antioxidant system in response to drought in Moneymaker than Ciettaicale.
2018
Michele Moles, Tommaso; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Federico De Pedro, Leandro; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo; Picciarelli, Piero; Scartazza, Andrea
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/931280
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