PURPOSE: Expression of IGFBP-2 in mice is regulated by leptin. Over-expression of IGFBP-2 is associated with reduced caloric intake and resistance to weight gain. Hormonal variations contributing to weight loss occur very early after bariatric surgery but have not been fully elucidated. We evaluated IGFBP-2 serum changes after bariatric surgery and their relationship with leptin variations to test the hypothesis that an increase of leptin sensitivity may explain some of the effects of gastric bypass. METHODS: This is a historical prospective study. Fifty-one obese patients (41 women e 10 men), 9 non-obese surgical controls and 41 lean matched controls were studied. Serum IGFBP-2 and leptin were measured after bariatric bypass surgery at various time points up to 18 months, after non-bariatric laparoscopic surgery in a control group, and in lean matched controls. RESULTS: Compared to lean controls, serum IGFBP-2 levels were lower in obese patients. After gastric bypass, IGFBP-2 significantly increased at 3 days and became normal before the occurrence of relevant changes in body weight, remaining stable up to 18 months after surgery. IGFBP-2/leptin ratio increased early after surgery and became normal after one year. CONCLUSIONS: After gastric bypass, serum IGFBP-2 increases in a window of time when variations of hormones mediating the effects of bariatric surgery occur. Our results suggest that IGFBP-2, a leptin-regulated protein, may be an in-vivo marker of leptin action. If this is the case, an early improvement of leptin sensitivity might contribute to the anorectic effect of gastric bypass.

Serum IGF-binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2) concentrations change early after gastric bypass bariatric surgery revealing a possible marker of leptin sensitivity in obese subjects

Ceccarini, Giovanni
Primo
;
Pelosini, Caterina
Secondo
;
Ferrari, Federica;Magno, Silvia;Vitti, Jacopo;Piaggi, Paolo;Maffei, Margherita
Penultimo
;
Santini, Ferruccio
Ultimo
2019-01-01

Abstract

PURPOSE: Expression of IGFBP-2 in mice is regulated by leptin. Over-expression of IGFBP-2 is associated with reduced caloric intake and resistance to weight gain. Hormonal variations contributing to weight loss occur very early after bariatric surgery but have not been fully elucidated. We evaluated IGFBP-2 serum changes after bariatric surgery and their relationship with leptin variations to test the hypothesis that an increase of leptin sensitivity may explain some of the effects of gastric bypass. METHODS: This is a historical prospective study. Fifty-one obese patients (41 women e 10 men), 9 non-obese surgical controls and 41 lean matched controls were studied. Serum IGFBP-2 and leptin were measured after bariatric bypass surgery at various time points up to 18 months, after non-bariatric laparoscopic surgery in a control group, and in lean matched controls. RESULTS: Compared to lean controls, serum IGFBP-2 levels were lower in obese patients. After gastric bypass, IGFBP-2 significantly increased at 3 days and became normal before the occurrence of relevant changes in body weight, remaining stable up to 18 months after surgery. IGFBP-2/leptin ratio increased early after surgery and became normal after one year. CONCLUSIONS: After gastric bypass, serum IGFBP-2 increases in a window of time when variations of hormones mediating the effects of bariatric surgery occur. Our results suggest that IGFBP-2, a leptin-regulated protein, may be an in-vivo marker of leptin action. If this is the case, an early improvement of leptin sensitivity might contribute to the anorectic effect of gastric bypass.
2019
Ceccarini, Giovanni; Pelosini, Caterina; Ferrari, Federica; Magno, Silvia; Vitti, Jacopo; Salvetti, Guido; Moretto, Carlo; Marioni, Antonio; Buccianti...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/987005
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