Increasing evidences indicate that in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert disease), an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder caused by a (CTG)n expansion in DMPK gene on chromosome 19q13. 3, is the most common form of inherited muscular dystrophy in adult patients with a global prevalence of 1/8000, and involvement of the central nervous system can be included within the core clinical manifestations of the disease. Variable in its severity and progression rate over time, likely due to the underlying causative molecular mechanisms; this component of the clinical picture presents with high heterogeneity involving cognitive and behavioral alterations, but also sensory-motor neural integration, and in any case, significantly contributing to the disease burden projected to either specific functional neuropsychological domains or quality of life as a whole. Principle manifestations include alterations of the frontal lobe function, which is more prominent in patients with an early onset, such as in congenital and childhood onset forms, here associated with severe intellectual disabilities, speech and language delay and reduced IQ-values, while in adult onset DM1 cognitive and neuropsychological findings are usually not so severe. Different methods to assess central nervous system involvement in DM1 have then recently been developed, these ranging from more classical psychometric and cognitive functional instruments to sophisticated psycophysic, neurophysiologic and especially computerized neuroimaging techniques, in order to better characterize this disease component, at the same time underlining the opportunity to consider it a suitable marker on which measuring putative effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. This is the reason why, as outlined in the conclusive section of this review, the Authors are lead to wonder, perhaps in a provocative and even paradoxical way to arise the question, whether or not the myologist, by now the popular figure in charge to care of a patient with the DM1, needs to remain himself a neurologist to better appreciate, evaluate and speculate on this important aspect of Steinert disease.

Central Nervous System Involvement as Outcome Measure for Clinical Trials Efficacy in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

Simoncini C.;Spadoni G.;Lai E.;Santoni L.;Ricci G.;Siciliano G.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Increasing evidences indicate that in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert disease), an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder caused by a (CTG)n expansion in DMPK gene on chromosome 19q13. 3, is the most common form of inherited muscular dystrophy in adult patients with a global prevalence of 1/8000, and involvement of the central nervous system can be included within the core clinical manifestations of the disease. Variable in its severity and progression rate over time, likely due to the underlying causative molecular mechanisms; this component of the clinical picture presents with high heterogeneity involving cognitive and behavioral alterations, but also sensory-motor neural integration, and in any case, significantly contributing to the disease burden projected to either specific functional neuropsychological domains or quality of life as a whole. Principle manifestations include alterations of the frontal lobe function, which is more prominent in patients with an early onset, such as in congenital and childhood onset forms, here associated with severe intellectual disabilities, speech and language delay and reduced IQ-values, while in adult onset DM1 cognitive and neuropsychological findings are usually not so severe. Different methods to assess central nervous system involvement in DM1 have then recently been developed, these ranging from more classical psychometric and cognitive functional instruments to sophisticated psycophysic, neurophysiologic and especially computerized neuroimaging techniques, in order to better characterize this disease component, at the same time underlining the opportunity to consider it a suitable marker on which measuring putative effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. This is the reason why, as outlined in the conclusive section of this review, the Authors are lead to wonder, perhaps in a provocative and even paradoxical way to arise the question, whether or not the myologist, by now the popular figure in charge to care of a patient with the DM1, needs to remain himself a neurologist to better appreciate, evaluate and speculate on this important aspect of Steinert disease.
2020
Simoncini, C.; Spadoni, G.; Lai, E.; Santoni, L.; Angelini, C.; Ricci, G.; Siciliano, G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1066032
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