Cigarette smoke is a mixture of chemicals having direct and/or indirect toxic effects on different lung cells. We investigated the effect of cigarette smoke on human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) oxidation and apoptosis. Cells were exposed to various concentrations (1, 5, and 10%) of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 3 h, and oxidative stress and apoptosis were assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and confocal laser fluorescence microscopy. Both oxidative stress and apoptosis exhibited a dose-response relationship with CSE concentrations. Lung fibroblasts also showed marked DNA fragmentation at the Comet assay after exposure to 10% CSE. Coincubation of HLF-1 cells with N-acetylcysteine (1 mM) during CSE exposure significantly reduced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and DNA fragmentation, whereas preincubation (3 h) with the glutathione-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine (125 microM) produced a significant increase of oxidative stress. Cigarette smoke is a potent source of oxidative stress, DNA damage, and apoptosis for HFL-1 cells, and we speculate that this could contribute to the development of pulmonary emphysema in the lungs of smokers.

Cigarette smoke extract induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in human lung fibroblasts

LONGONI, BIANCAMARIA;BARALE, ROBERTO;PAGGIARO, PIER LUIGI;CELI, ALESSANDRO;GIUNTINI, CARLO
2003-01-01

Abstract

Cigarette smoke is a mixture of chemicals having direct and/or indirect toxic effects on different lung cells. We investigated the effect of cigarette smoke on human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) oxidation and apoptosis. Cells were exposed to various concentrations (1, 5, and 10%) of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 3 h, and oxidative stress and apoptosis were assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and confocal laser fluorescence microscopy. Both oxidative stress and apoptosis exhibited a dose-response relationship with CSE concentrations. Lung fibroblasts also showed marked DNA fragmentation at the Comet assay after exposure to 10% CSE. Coincubation of HLF-1 cells with N-acetylcysteine (1 mM) during CSE exposure significantly reduced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and DNA fragmentation, whereas preincubation (3 h) with the glutathione-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine (125 microM) produced a significant increase of oxidative stress. Cigarette smoke is a potent source of oxidative stress, DNA damage, and apoptosis for HFL-1 cells, and we speculate that this could contribute to the development of pulmonary emphysema in the lungs of smokers.
2003
Carnevali, S; Petruzzelli, S; Longoni, Biancamaria; Vanacore, R; Barale, Roberto; Cipollini, M; Scatena, F; Paggiaro, PIER LUIGI; Celi, Alessandro; Giuntini, Carlo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/186225
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