Importance: Difficult-to-heal wounds pose clinical and economic challenges, and cost-effective treatment options are needed. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the cost-effectiveness of extracellular matrix (ECM) relative to standard of care (SC) on wound closure for the treatment of mixed arterial/venous (A/V) or venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Design, setting, and participants: A two-stage Markov model was used to predict the expected costs and outcomes of wound closure for ECM and SC. Outcome data used in the analysis were taken from an 8-week randomized clinical trial that directly compared ECM and SC. Patients were followed up for an additional 6 months to assess wound closure. Forty-eight patients completed the study; 25 for ECM and 23 for SC. SC was defined as a standard moist wound dressing. Transition probabilities for the Markov states were estimated from the clinical trial. Main outcomes and measures: The economic outcome of interest was direct cost per closed-wound week. Resource utilization was based on the treatment regimen used in the clinical trial. Costs were derived from standard cost references. The payer’s perspective was taken. Results: ECM-treated wounds closed, on average, after 5.4 weeks of treatment, compared with 8.3 weeks for SC wounds (P=0.02). Furthermore, complete wound closure was significantly higher in patients treated with ECM (P<0.05), with 20 wounds closed in the ECM group (80%) and 15 wounds closed in the SC group (65%). After 8 months, patients treated with ECM had substantially higher closed-wound weeks compared with SC (26.0 weeks versus 22.0 weeks, respectively). Expected direct costs per patient were $2, 527 for ECM and $2, 540 for SC (a cost savings of $13). Conclusion and relevance: ECM yielded better clinical outcomes at a slightly lower cost in patients with mixed A/V and VLUs. ECM is an effective treatment for wound healing and should be considered for use in the management of mixed A/V and VLUs.

Difficult-to-heal wounds of mixed arterial/venous and venous etiology: A cost-effectiveness analysis of extracellular matrix

ROMANELLI, MARCO;DINI, VALENTINA
2016

Abstract

Importance: Difficult-to-heal wounds pose clinical and economic challenges, and cost-effective treatment options are needed. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the cost-effectiveness of extracellular matrix (ECM) relative to standard of care (SC) on wound closure for the treatment of mixed arterial/venous (A/V) or venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Design, setting, and participants: A two-stage Markov model was used to predict the expected costs and outcomes of wound closure for ECM and SC. Outcome data used in the analysis were taken from an 8-week randomized clinical trial that directly compared ECM and SC. Patients were followed up for an additional 6 months to assess wound closure. Forty-eight patients completed the study; 25 for ECM and 23 for SC. SC was defined as a standard moist wound dressing. Transition probabilities for the Markov states were estimated from the clinical trial. Main outcomes and measures: The economic outcome of interest was direct cost per closed-wound week. Resource utilization was based on the treatment regimen used in the clinical trial. Costs were derived from standard cost references. The payer’s perspective was taken. Results: ECM-treated wounds closed, on average, after 5.4 weeks of treatment, compared with 8.3 weeks for SC wounds (P=0.02). Furthermore, complete wound closure was significantly higher in patients treated with ECM (P<0.05), with 20 wounds closed in the ECM group (80%) and 15 wounds closed in the SC group (65%). After 8 months, patients treated with ECM had substantially higher closed-wound weeks compared with SC (26.0 weeks versus 22.0 weeks, respectively). Expected direct costs per patient were $2, 527 for ECM and $2, 540 for SC (a cost savings of $13). Conclusion and relevance: ECM yielded better clinical outcomes at a slightly lower cost in patients with mixed A/V and VLUs. ECM is an effective treatment for wound healing and should be considered for use in the management of mixed A/V and VLUs.
Romanelli, Marco; Gilligan, Adrienne M.; Waycaster, Curtis R.; Dini, Valentina
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/820284
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