Understanding and modelling liver biomechanics represents a significant challenge due to the complex nature of this organ. Unfortunately, there is no consensus on liver viscoelastic properties, and results are strongly dependent on sample type and status, adopted testing method, and testing conditions. Standard force-triggered tests (e.g. step response or dynamic mechanical tests) necessitate an initial contact between sample and testing apparatus, which may result in significant pre-stress to very soft and highly hydrated samples. In a previous study we proposed the epsilon dot method (): a testing and analysis framework to address the drawbacks of standard mechanical tests. Focusing on ex-vivo unconfined bulk compressive tests, here we use both and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) to derive liver viscoelastic parameters in the region of small strains or the linear viscoelastic region (LVR). As liver samples were visibly deteriorated at the end of frequency sweep tests, a modified approach was adopted to reduce DMA testing times. This approach, termed step-reconstructed DMA (SRDMA), is based on dynamic measurements around specific frequencies and then reconstruction of liver behaviour in the entire frequency range of interest. The instantaneous elastic modulus obtained from SRDMA tests (2.65±0.30 kPa) was significantly higher than that obtained with the (2.04±0.01 kPa). We show that the overestimation of stiffness is due to data acquisition in a local rather than an absolute LVR, highlighting the importance of using a rapid and zero pre-stress approach to characterise very soft and highly hydrated biological tissues.

Viscoelastic Characterisation of Pig Liver in Unconfined Compression

G. Mattei
Primo
;
TIRELLA, ANNALISA
Secondo
;
GALLONE, GIUSEPPE CARMINE
Penultimo
;
AHLUWALIA, ARTI DEVI
Ultimo
2014-01-01

Abstract

Understanding and modelling liver biomechanics represents a significant challenge due to the complex nature of this organ. Unfortunately, there is no consensus on liver viscoelastic properties, and results are strongly dependent on sample type and status, adopted testing method, and testing conditions. Standard force-triggered tests (e.g. step response or dynamic mechanical tests) necessitate an initial contact between sample and testing apparatus, which may result in significant pre-stress to very soft and highly hydrated samples. In a previous study we proposed the epsilon dot method (): a testing and analysis framework to address the drawbacks of standard mechanical tests. Focusing on ex-vivo unconfined bulk compressive tests, here we use both and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) to derive liver viscoelastic parameters in the region of small strains or the linear viscoelastic region (LVR). As liver samples were visibly deteriorated at the end of frequency sweep tests, a modified approach was adopted to reduce DMA testing times. This approach, termed step-reconstructed DMA (SRDMA), is based on dynamic measurements around specific frequencies and then reconstruction of liver behaviour in the entire frequency range of interest. The instantaneous elastic modulus obtained from SRDMA tests (2.65±0.30 kPa) was significantly higher than that obtained with the (2.04±0.01 kPa). We show that the overestimation of stiffness is due to data acquisition in a local rather than an absolute LVR, highlighting the importance of using a rapid and zero pre-stress approach to characterise very soft and highly hydrated biological tissues.
2014
Mattei, G.; Tirella, Annalisa; Gallone, GIUSEPPE CARMINE; Ahluwalia, ARTI DEVI
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Journal of Biomechanics_2014_Giorgio_Fegato_DMTA_1-s2.0-S0021929014003285.pdf

solo utenti autorizzati

Tipologia: Versione finale editoriale
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 634.82 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
634.82 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/486469
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 35
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 34
social impact